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T.J. HOOKER - THE SOUNDTRACK!

A T.J. Hooker event! For the first time ever, TJ-Hooker.com presents a compilation of some of the greatest incidental music, guest star performances and dialogue from America's Greatest Cop Show!

Compiled, edited and mastered by our own 4Adam30 (who also, incidentally, wrote the extensive liner notes), T.J. Hooker - The Soundtrack includes over an hour of T.J. Hooker sounds--all available as FREE MP3 files!

Click on the name of the song to download it!

T.J. HOOKER - THE SOUNDTRACK
original theme by Mark Snow | incidental music by John Davis III

featuring songs by:
Jerry Lee Lewis | Adrian Zmed | Midnight Star | Herbie Hancock | William Shatner

liner notes by TJ-Hooker.com's 4Adam30

  Track Title Time Size
01 T.J. Hooker Main Title Theme 1.27 1.3MB
  Mark Snow's compelling theme remixed to accompany the opening credits of T.J. Hooker's third season. Ostinato violins and synthesizers that combine to mimic the sound of a police siren are interrupted by the clash of electronic drums to herald the arrival of T.J. Hooker on-screen. The siren motif is repeated midway, albeit this time it is a lengthy howl as opposed to the minimalist repetition of the opening bars. Purely visceral music, this mix of the theme gives it a more contemporary sound. Hooker's status as a true transition between the cop shows of the 1970s and the 1980s is never more apparent.
02 4Adam30 Dispatches the Diamond Thieves 3.33 3.2MB
  from episode 2.13 - "Deadly Ambition"
Beginning with a reprise of the T.J. Hooker theme, this exciting music recycles some themes used often throughout the series' run, but includes an exciting motif which doubles electric guitar and flute wrought against a driving backbeat, creating an air of impending doom for Hooker's old friend Ben Edwards, a security guard who is shot during the break-in.
03 A Thug's First Car Theft 1.37 1.4MB
  from episode 2.12 - "The Survival Syndrome"
Piano and strings accompany David Harmon's friend Greg on his first attempt at stealing a car. A wah-wah'd electric guitar provides a tinge of menace as David and Greg rendezvous with their slimy benefactors Thomas and Lawson.
04 Romano is Shot 1.21 1.2MB
  from episode 2.12 - "The Survival Syndrome"
Dissonant strings foreshadow Romano's fate as he approaches the van carrying David, Greg, Thomas and Lawson. A subdued reprise of the chase theme leads to the shooting; poetically, a solitary bell tolls for Romano as Hooker comforts his fallen comrade.
05 "You're Dead, Romano" 1.16 1.1MB
  from episode 2.12 - "The Survival Syndrome"
Snare rolls and eerie yet simple synthesizer music accompanies Romano's turn in a hi-tech computer-controlled police training simulator. Romano stands before a projection screen displaying film footage of a confrontation with a crazed man holding a knife. Romano fails his test, resulting in his theoretical death which is announced to him by Hooker over a plaintive piano motif.
06 David's Phone Call / Hooker Saves the Day 4.58 4.5MB
  from episode 2.12 - "The Survival Syndrome"
After an informing phone call from David Harmon, triumphant strings announce Romano's readiness to enter the fray as 4Adam30 speeds towards the Gear Box Transmission Shop. A restatement of the chase theme on horns precedes some classic Hooker confrontation music, including more heavily wah-wah'd electric guitar. A sobering restatement of the Hooker main theme segues into a classic commercial break signature.
07 "Whole Lotta Shakin" (Jerry Lee Lewis) 2.56 2.6MB
  from episode 2.13 - "Deadly Ambition"
The Killer himself, Jerry Lee Lewis, performs one of his greatest hits while Hooker, Romano, Stacy and some hangers-on watch and talk amongst themselves in one of Hooker's finest uses of source music (i.e. music whose "source" appears on-screen).
08 Paul Joins the Chase / Hooker Saves Paul 3.25 3.1MB
  from episode 2.21 - "Vengeance is Mine"
Glissando harp with string accompaniment segues into the chase theme as the 4Adam30 crew are revealed to be teamed up with Hooker's old friend Paul McGuire, portrayed by Leonard Nimoy. Horns, strings, electric guitar and drums all figure prominently in an excellent montage of pursuit and capture accompaniment.
09 Sweet Val's Deadly Aerobics Class 0.37 592K
  from episode 2.21 - "Vengeance is Mine"
Paul McGuire's daughter Val is an aerobics instructor who is raped by one of her students. This peppy cue covers the short introduction sequence which sees Val instructing the man whose victim she will become.
10 Lisa's Red Rocket 3.23 3.1MB
  from episode 4.54 - "Anatomy of a Killing"
Hooker's ex-partner Jim Cody (portrayed by ex-NFL great Jim Brown) waits up for his daughter Lisa, who has fallen in with the wrong crowd. Hammered-on bass guitar and staccato electric guitar segue into plaintive piano and strings as Cody secretly watches Lisa come home in her car, labeled "Lisa's Red Rocket." Heavily distorted guitar, synthesizer and Simmons drums come to the fore as some of Lisa's friends participate in a gangland hit that's "not personal."
11 "You're Just a Man" - Stacy's Exotic Dance 2.52 2.6MB
  from episode 3.29 - "Carnal Express"
Source music for Stacy's turn as an exotic dancer at The Pleasure Palace. A heavy backbeat and throaty vocals by an anonymous female artist accompany Stacy during her foot-tapping, finger-snapping spectacle.
12 "Run Girl, Run" (Adrian Zmed) - Romano's Exotic Dance 3.04 2.8MB
  from episode 3.46 - "Death Strip"
Source music with a metafictional bent, "Run Girl, Run" is sung by Adrian Zmed himself (a track from his solo album Adrian Zmed, produced by Rick Derringer). A slice of pure '80s guitar rock, this rousing number--along with Zmed's on-screen performance as a male stripper--prove that Romano's turn as an exotic dancer beats Stacy's similar escapade hands-down.
13 "Freak - A - Zoid" / Righteous Drug Bust 6.35 6MB
  from episode 3.38 - "Undercover Affair"
Blurring the distinction between source and incidental music, Midnight Star's 1983 synth-funk hit "Freak - A - Zoid" (from the album No Parking on the Dance Floor) accompanies a display of streetside break dancers, proving that T.J. Hooker always had its finger on the pulse of the popular culture of the day. This dose of urban realism segues into more traditional incidental music as the 4Adam30 crew interject themselves into a chase begun by a pair of federal agents, while the 4Adam16 crew holds out as backup.
14 Chinatown Chase 3.29 3.1MB
  from episode 3.30 - "Chinatown"
An ominous tuba and strings overture sets the scene for a holdup at a cock fight in Chinatown. Electronic drums blare as 4Adam30 responds to the call, and a restatement of the chase theme sounds as Stacy announces 4Adam16's backup position. Heavy string and harp statements merge with synthesizer flourishes during the ensuing chase, ending with guitar and drums as Romano uses a double-barreled shotgun to subdue an escapee.
15 Hooker Sings in the Shower (William Shatner) 2.24 2.2MB
  from episode 3.30 - "Chinatown"
During one of Romano's many visits to Hooker's hotel room at the Safari Inn, Hooker serenades himself during his daily ablutions before partaking in some witty repartee with his young partner.
16 "Hooker is Dead" 3.29 3.1MB
  from episode 3.47 - "Psychic Terror"
Atmospheric synthesizer lines and minimal guitar accompany psychic Julia Hudson's frightening premonition of the murder of T.J. Hooker. Hudson (portrayed by William Shatner's then-wife Marcy Lafferty) awakes from her prescient nightmare and writes "Hooker is Dead" on a pad of paper. Some banter between Hooker, Romano, Stacy and Corrigan about Hooker's mistrust of psychics serves to foreshadow the inevitable untruth of Hudson's divination.
17 Teresa's Cantina 1.12 1.1MB
  from episode 3.48 - "Gang War"
Once again drawing on Hooker's urban setting, we hear a song sung in Spanish. This source music sets the scene as Hooker prepares to make an announcement to the denizens of a local cantina.
18 Showdown with Frank Medavoy 4.09 3.8MB
  from episode 3.37 - "Blue Murder"
Hooker and his old-mentor-gone-bad Frank Medavoy confront each other in a junkyard. After a signal from Medavoy, one of his rogue cop henchmen fires at Hooker, beginning a marvelous piece of incidental music. Throbbing synth lines provide the underlying structure for syncopated Simmons drums, power chord guitar flourishes and some sassy synthesized horns.
19 Hooker's Nightmare / Johnny Gets Shot 2.38 2.4MB
  from episode 3.28 - "The Return"
The most eerie and ominous use of the T.J. Hooker theme yet, impressionistic synthesizer and string lines are bathed in reverb as Hooker dreams about his old partner Johnny Durrell, who was killed in the line of duty. A sweeping string section plays a broad melody which builds to a crescendo as Hooker awakes, the name of his dead partner on his lips. His clock radio suddenly springs to life, blaring some boogie-woogie big band music which will become a symbol for the cyclical nature of existence later in the episode.
20 The One-Handed Man Returns 2.47 2.5MB
  from episode 3.28 - "The Return"
A sprig of ostinato synthesizer is quickly replaced with a bold restatement of the T.J. Hooker chase theme in a full arrangement.
21 "Rock It" (Herbie Hancock) - Evelyn North's Exotic Dance 2.25 2.2MB
  from episode 3.28 - "The Return"
An inspired choice of source music for the exotic dance of a Hooker informant, Herbie Hancock's "Rock It" serves up a healthy dose of old school funk with a dash of street cred; its ambitious turntablism brought to the fore, this groundbreaking track does more to establish the sassy-yet-in-control characterization of Evelyn North than Marine Jahan, the actress who portrayed her, did herself. Once her dance number is completed, the music shifts to a more lackluster dance instrumental.
22 Hooker Chases Freddie Hamilton 2.27 2.2MB
  from episode 3.28 - "The Return"
Evelyn North tips Hooker off to the whereabouts of Freddie Hamilton, a crooked restaurateur. Stacy and Corrigan go undercover and coerce him into making a drug deal. Hooker breaks in and gives chase, accompanied by one of the most powerful readings of the chase theme in the show's history. Crisp electronic percussion dominates.
23 "Everything Changes, Hooker" 0.53 844K
  from episode 3.28 - "The Return"
The One-Handed Man behind bars, Hooker, Romano, Stacy and Corrigan pay a visit to the local fair at the pier. After waxing poetic with Corrigan, Hooker walks off into the sunset alone on the beach, unshod, to the same big band music he earlier heard on his clock radio. Beautiful.
24 End Title Theme 0.34 536K
  A rapid restatement of the T.J. Hooker main title theme, from the third season.
BONUS TRACK
25 The Original T.J. Hooker Theme 1.03 992K
  The only version of the T.J. Hooker theme to be commercially released, the theme as presented for the show's first season has more in common with cop show themes of the 1970s than that of the show's own decade. An interesting musical sketch for the bold and timely version that would eventually become the show's trademark.


T.J. Hooker, all character names and imagery from the show
©Columbia TriStar Television.

This soundtrack is intended for private entertainment purposes only and no violation of copyright is intended. Unlawful reproduction or sale of this soundtrack is strictly prohibited.



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